Opiate overdose reversal training highlights life saving response to ODs


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Brenda Harden | The Sentinel Bambi French of Maryhaven demonstrating how to administer Naloxone to overdoes patients.


Brenda Harden | The Sentinel Dr. Steve Novack, left, and Richard Steele, right, giving their training presentation.


United Way of Morrow County recently hosted an opiate overdose reversal training with Maryhaven for people of the community, as well as different county agencies.

Dr. Steve Novack and Richard Steele from Maryhaven spoke to those in attendance about dealing with an overdose from the influx of opiates in Morrow County.

Overdoses occur in urban, rural and suburban areas throughout the state. Dr. Novack said all people who use opioids are at risk for an overdose.

Additionally, Novack presented a slide show and discussed signs one might look for if a person were overdosing. Ohio is experiencing a large volume of narcotics that is appearing in rural communities similar to those in Morrow County.

He said that opioids can impair your ability to breathe and people with health problems such as asthma are at an increased risk for overdosing.

Additionally, many overdoses occur when people mix prescription drugs with alcohol, benzodiazepines or anti-depressants.

Along with Dr. Novack’s presentation, Bambi French from Maryhaven demonstrated how to administer Naloxone to a person who is overdosing.

The opioid blocking drug can be given through a nasal spray.

Everyone at the training event was given an opportunity to receive an overdose kit.

Brenda Harden | The Sentinel Bambi French of Maryhaven demonstrating how to administer Naloxone to overdoes patients.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/29/2016/06/web1_seran-1.jpgBrenda Harden | The Sentinel Bambi French of Maryhaven demonstrating how to administer Naloxone to overdoes patients.

Brenda Harden | The Sentinel Dr. Steve Novack, left, and Richard Steele, right, giving their training presentation.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/29/2016/06/web1_shrane-1.jpgBrenda Harden | The Sentinel Dr. Steve Novack, left, and Richard Steele, right, giving their training presentation.

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