Girl Scouts reach goals with cookies


Scouts learning about supply and demand through cookies sales

By Rhonda Bletner - Morrow County Sentinel



Troop 3558 sells a variety of Girl Scout Cookies at a booth in Cardington, dressed as bakers with their hats and aprons and one special cookie. In front, from left, are Natalie Lambert, Aliyah Graham, and Amiya Bowling. In back are troop leader Becky Bowling,Brynn Segaard, Emma Shockley with leader Julie Schockley behind her.

Troop 3558 sells a variety of Girl Scout Cookies at a booth in Cardington, dressed as bakers with their hats and aprons and one special cookie. In front, from left, are Natalie Lambert, Aliyah Graham, and Amiya Bowling. In back are troop leader Becky Bowling,Brynn Segaard, Emma Shockley with leader Julie Schockley behind her.


MOUNT GILEAD — What is the most searched for Girl Scout Cookie in Ohio?

According to the Food Network, a January Google Search trend revealed the search for Girl Scout cookie varieties varies from state to state, but in all states the most sought-after cookies are Do-si-dos, Tagalongs, Thin Mints (the most searched for of all time and the most popular in Ohio), and the new Adventurefuls.

Those new cookies aren’t available, though. Adventurefuls, described as “a brownie-inspired cookie topped with caramel flavored crème with a hint of sea salt,” sold out. However, many of the other cookie varieties are available.

“Every time a new cookie comes out, everyone wants to try them so they always come out a little short,” said Michelle Montague, a troop leader in Mount Gilead.

”My troop’s experience is it took us a week longer to get our Tres Foils and Samoas, but I believe we have all the cookies we need to complete our orders.”

In Cardington, Troop 3558 are selling at booths on various days. Leader Becky Bowling said they sold approximately 300 boxes of cookies last weekend. Leader Julie Shockley added, “We couldn’t do it without the help of excellent volunteers.” Candy Mackland was one of those volunteers helping at the book Friday evening.

“It is cookie season until March 20th,” said Chief Executive Officer of the Girl Scouts of Ohio Heartland Council Tammy Wharton. There have been some delays but the council is working to make as many varieties available as possible.

“There are about 1.7 million packages of cookies that go out. So, you can imagine it is a delivery chain jigsaw puzzle: There can be weather delays; COVID’s hit, so there’s been trucker shortages; and then the bakers had some challenges with getting all of the cookies baked in time for some of the deliveries.

“COViD has had its ugly hands on the cookie program this year. However, if you think about it, we look at it as a way the of the girls learning about the supply chain. The girls are learning about what’s happening in the world, in real time, through their cookie program,” Wharton said.

“They are learning some additional tools of communication: how to communicate when their customers are going to get their cookies, how to share what is happening, and share the program. And maybe you’re not going to get the Adventurefuls, the new cookie – an adventure in every box, and finding them at this point can be an adventure,” Wharton continued.

Supply and demand is a lesson for the Scouts through the cookie program, as well as what’s happening in the world at large.

“If we go into a store and they see the store shelves, the girls are learning that products are skimpy on the shelves, so it’s not surprising that we’re facing some of the same challenges. If you think about the entire supply chain, getting ingredients to the bakery is the start of that supply chain” said Wharton.

“We’re trying to teach life lessons in this very challenging time. Our hearts are going out to the girls that are learning these life lessons. Our hope is that the consumers are still supporting the girls if their favorite variety isn’t in the booth.”

This year’s cookie sales theme is “Climb with Courage.” The Girl Scouts learn the five skills associated with the program: money management, people skills, goal setting, business ethics, and communication skills.

They also earn proceeds. From each box of cookies sold a portion goes to the cost of the cookies; a portion goes to the Scout troop for projects or rewards they choose; and a portion goes to the Scout Council, which here in Ohio is the Heartland Council, for council support services like upkeep of the camp and volunteer training.

Montague has 10 girls in her troop in grades 8-12 and as an older troop, they enjoy field trips.

“So far this year we’ve had trouble with COVID, like everyone else. And since our girls are getting older, our biggest challenge is finding time that all of them are free to do something at the same time, with athletics, and music and all the extra-curriculars they’re involved in. But we’ve had movie nights; we had a nice Christmas party; we went to the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, she said.

“Generally, when we do these things, the girls don’t have to pay for any of it because of their cookie money. The troop’s long term goal is to go to Washington D.C. so they’re saving some of their cookie money every year so that once it is safe to travel we can do that,” Montague added.

For anyone who wants to support the program or just loves the cookies but doesn’t know a Girl Scout or hasn’t seen them selling them, they can go to gsoh.org/findcookies.html and type in your zip code. There is an option to order from a troop near you and there is also a listing of booths (places and times where the Scouts will be set up nearby).

For example, Cardington Scouts have a booth scheduled at American Legion Park, 307 Park Avenue, Cardington on Saturday, March 12 from 2-4 p.m. and at Pirate’s Cove, 126 East Main St. Cardington on Friday, March 18 from 5:30 -7:30 p.m.

Troop 3558 sells a variety of Girl Scout Cookies at a booth in Cardington, dressed as bakers with their hats and aprons and one special cookie. In front, from left, are Natalie Lambert, Aliyah Graham, and Amiya Bowling. In back are troop leader Becky Bowling,Brynn Segaard, Emma Shockley with leader Julie Schockley behind her.
https://www.morrowcountysentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/29/2022/03/web1_IMG-8213-2.jpgTroop 3558 sells a variety of Girl Scout Cookies at a booth in Cardington, dressed as bakers with their hats and aprons and one special cookie. In front, from left, are Natalie Lambert, Aliyah Graham, and Amiya Bowling. In back are troop leader Becky Bowling,Brynn Segaard, Emma Shockley with leader Julie Schockley behind her.
Scouts learning about supply and demand through cookies sales

By Rhonda Bletner

Morrow County Sentinel