Just 200 years ago


Reflections - By Evelyn Long



I have had inquiries since the Focus page was published describing the program when the addition to the Nichols Street School was dedicated.

“When was the first school built in the village?” Exactly 200 years ago, 1823 the first public school structure was built in Cardington Township, northeast of Cardington. The next year, in 1824, a log school was built just west of the West Main Street railroad bridge.

This was behind the building that once was Dreamland Theater and also the site of Kensel “Zeb” Russell’s business place. The site was selected because of a flowing spring near that location.

The school was later moved to the old cemetery lot and then to a lot on East Main Street owned by Ansn St. John. All of these schools were of log construction. The first frame building was erected in 1830 on the corner of Second and Center Streets and was used both as a school and church. For 14 years it was the only school in the village. A second frame building built in 1843 was used as a school for 15 years before being sold in 1868 and converted into a two family dwelling and remains a residence today.

It is located on East Walnut Street, two homes from Center Street. Then the Union School was built on Nicholas Street in 1868. The most modern in the county. In 1924, much of that building was incorporated into into the building erected on the same site and housed all 12 grades. As attendance grew, the current building was constructed on State Route 529 in 1967. Many changes have been made to that building through the years as it is now the home of grades 5-12. The building on Nichols Street houses grades K-4. Cardington has always cared about the education of its youth.

Looking back: January 1943: Morrow County residents were asked to donate five tons of tin cans per month for the war effort.

January 1973: Mrs. Anna Matthes of Third Street reported daffodils growing at her home due to recent warm weather.

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Reflections

By Evelyn Long