Residents make masks, do other chores at home


Others do household projects, home school

By Anthony Conchel - aconchel@aimmediamidwest.com



Patty Humphrey and her daughter Megan made more than 100 masks for local nursing homes.

Patty Humphrey and her daughter Megan made more than 100 masks for local nursing homes.


Courtesy Photo

MARENGO — Patty Humphrey and her daughter saw a chance to help others during the coronavirus pandemic.

“My daughter Megan and I used up our leftover quilt fabric and made masks and donated them to local nursing homes,” Humphrey said.

They made 106 masks and took them to Bennington Glen and Morrow Manor in Chesterville.

“We just thought it was the thing to do, kind of pay it forward. I was raised that if there is a need and you have the know-how to help, just do it,” Patty said.

Her husband works in the heating and cooling business. “He’s considered essential, so he was working and we were at home.”

Humphrey had plenty of fabric and elastic for the ear loops.

“I was cleaning out my crafting supplies. I do craft shows and those are cancelled, so I was sitting here with nothing to do,” she said.

They delivered the masks last Friday.

“I figured they need them now, so we got busy and got them done in three days,” she said. “I’ve been sewing since I was six years old.”

The masks are a cotton fabric, with light tan on the inside and a variety of colors and patterns on the outside. They can be worn over regular surgical masks, she said.

“It’s the same fabric I use for dolls. Just a simple rectangle using rotary cutters; quick and easy,” Humphrey said.

“Hopefully it’s something cute and it makes them smile.”

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Others are keeping busy in a variety of ways.

Denise Stillwell is using the time to take walks on her country road and pick up trash.

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Nancy Jesson moved into town with her sister. “We are in the process of making a patio out back of her house and cleaning the garage,” she said.

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Crystal Cook also is making masks to donate to people in the medical community.

Stephanie Heston says she is “reading, cleaning house, sending cards and calling shut-ins.”

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Liz Combes is making soap and other products to sell online and home schooling.

Christy L Wallace said she works at a pandemic child care center “so our other essential workers know their children are safe.”

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Donna Carver is thankful her grandson Aiden is attending virtual preschool with his teacher, Barbara Guda. “Mount Gilead teachers are doing an excellent job adapting during this trying time,” Carver said.

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Brandie Eichhorn is splitting her time. between work and home.

“I am a Highland bus driver out delivering our kids lunches every day. Besides that, I stay at home and entertain/school my two kids. We are enjoying this down time,” she said.

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Jenn Nicole’s house is full.

“There are two families living in our household at this time. It started before the pandemic began. We now have seven children and four adults, and to say it’s been chaotic is an understatement,” she said.

The kids’ ages are 3, 6, 7, 10, 13, 13 and 15.

“We are trying our best to stay on a routine; bigger kids helping little kids while the adults work.”

The 10-year-old is being tutored by a family friend via FaceTime.

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Alex Arrowood of Cardington continues working.

“I own a carpet cleaning business in Columbus. I still work doing vacant homes or working while the homeowner takes a walk. I’ve cut down to one-man crews and we wear gloves. Like most, we are out of masks so we do our best to limit exposure. Business has definitely slowed,” he said.

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Jeremy Dowalter is outdoors “getting ready for spring; built new chicken coop/run, raised beds for gardening, new greenhouse put together, started seeds, have three kinds of peppers, lots of tomatoes, broccoli, spices.”

Patty Humphrey and her daughter Megan made more than 100 masks for local nursing homes.
https://www.morrowcountysentinel.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/29/2020/04/web1_masks-1.jpgPatty Humphrey and her daughter Megan made more than 100 masks for local nursing homes. Courtesy Photo
Others do household projects, home school

By Anthony Conchel

aconchel@aimmediamidwest.com